Home » Journal Kept by Sergeant David Holden of Groton, Mass: During the Latter Part of the French and Indian War, February 20 November 29, 1760 by Samuel a Green
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Excerpt from Journal Kept by Sergeant David Holden of Groton, Mass: During the Latter Part of the French and Indian War, February 20 November 29, 1760At a meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society, on Thursday, June 13, 1889, Dr. Samuel A.MoreExcerpt from Journal Kept by Sergeant David Holden of Groton, Mass: During the Latter Part of the French and Indian War, February 20 November 29, 1760At a meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society, on Thursday, June 13, 1889, Dr. Samuel A. Green communicated a copy of the following journal, kept during the latter part of the French and Indian War, and now presented to the Library by Mr. Henry Sylvanus Bunton, town treasurer of Hyde Park, Massachusetts.David Holden, the writer, was the First Sergeant in Captain Leonard Whitings company. He was a son of John and Sarah (Davis) Holden, and born at Groton, on December 10, 1738. His family, in both its branches, had suffered much from Indian warfare. His grandfather, Stephen Holden, with his two biggest sons, - one of them Davids father, - was taken by the Indians during the summer of 1697, and held in captivity for nearly two years- and his mother was a niece of John Davis, who was killed by the Indians, in his own door-yard, on October 25, 1704.On July 13, 1761, David was married to Sarah, daughter of the Reverend Phinehas and Sarah (Stevens) Hemenway, of Townsend, who was born on October 25, 1739. There is a tradition in the family that the first time he ever saw his wife was while drilling a squad of men at Groton for the campaign of 1760. After his return from the army he lived during some years at Townsend, where most of his children were born.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.