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Ancient Egyptian Titles Books LLC

Ancient Egyptian Titles

Books LLC

Published May 5th 2010
ISBN : 9781155611556
Paperback
68 pages
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 About the Book 

Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Pharaoh, Great Royal Wife, Gods Wife of Amun, Two Ladies,MorePurchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Pharaoh, Great Royal Wife, Gods Wife of Amun, Two Ladies, Ancient Egyptian Royal Titulary, Divine Adoratrice of Amun, Vizier, Khenemetneferhedjet, Nomarch, Khekeret-Nisut, Treasurer, Kerheb, Servant in the Place of Truth, Xry Hbt, Haty-A, Fan-Bearer on the Right Side of the King. Excerpt: The royal titulary or royal protocol of an Egyptian Pharaoh is the standard naming convention taken by the kings of Ancient Egypt. It symbolises worldly power and holy might and also acts as a sort of mission statement for the reign of a monarch (sometimes it even changed during the reign). The full titulary, consisting of five names, did not come into standard usage until the Middle Kingdom but remained in use as late as the Roman Empire . Horus name Serekh containing the name of Djet and an association with Wadjet, on display at the Louvre item This name was usually written in a serekh, a representation of a palace faade. The name of the pharaoh was written in hieroglyphs inside this representation of a palace. Typically an image of the falcon God Horus was perched on top or beside it. This is the oldest form of the pharaohs name, originating in the Predynastic Period . Many of the oldest-known Egyptian pharaohs were known only by this title. The king was thought to be the earthly embodiment of Horus, the son of Hathor (or Hathor-Isis ), later becoming known as the Strong Bull of His Mother. At least one Egyptian ruler, the Second Dynasty Seth-Peribsen, used an image of the god Seth instead of Horus, perhaps signifying an internal religious division within the country. He was succeeded by Khasekhemwy, who placed the symbols of both Set and Horus above his name. Thereafter, the image of Horus always appeared alongside the name of the pharaoh. By the time of the New Kingdom the Horus na...